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Drug Interactions With Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide - Generic Teveten HCT

This page contains links to eMedTV Hypertension Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide to Generic Teveten HCT. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Drug Interactions With Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide
    Insulin and NSAIDs are among the drugs that can potentially interact with valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide. This eMedTV Web page warns that drug interactions with valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide can change how your body metabolizes the drugs.
  • Dynacirc
    Dynacirc is a blood pressure medication that is available by prescription. This eMedTV page describes how Dynacirc works to lower blood pressure, lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment, and offers dosing information for the drug.
  • Dynacirc and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women are generally advised to avoid taking Dynacirc (isradipine). As this eMedTV segment explains, since no studies have been conducted on Dynacirc and breastfeeding, it is not known if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Dynacirc and Dry Mouth
    In clinical studies, dry mouth was reported as a rare side effect of Dynacirc (isradipine). This segment of the eMedTV library contains more information on Dynacirc and dry mouth, and includes a list of helpful tips that may provide relief.
  • Dynacirc and Impotence
    Impotence appears to be a rare but possible side effect of Dynacirc (isradipine). This eMedTV resource provides a more in-depth look at Dynacirc and impotence, and explains what you should do if impotence occurs during high blood pressure treatment.
  • Dynacirc and Pregnancy
    At this time, the full risks of using Dynacirc (isradipine) during pregnancy are not known. This eMedTV article further discusses Dynacirc and pregnancy, and describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant rats and rabbits.
  • Dynacirc Capsules
    Dynacirc capsules are used to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV presentation takes a closer look at Dynacirc, including details on drug interactions, warnings, side effects, and dosing. A link to more information is included.
  • Dynacirc Dosage
    The maximum Dynacirc dosage for high blood pressure control is 5 mg once daily. As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, Dynacirc dosing usually starts at 2.5 mg twice daily, but the dosage can be increased or decreased as needed.
  • Dynacirc Drug Interactions
    Cimetidine, imatinib, and nefazodone are medications that may cause drug interactions with Dynacirc. This eMedTV page provides a more complete list of medicines that can cause negative Dynacirc drug interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Dynacirc Overdose
    Lightheadedness, dizziness, and fainting are some of the possible signs of a Dynacirc overdose. This eMedTV Web page describes other possible effects of a Dynacirc (isradipine) overdose and lists the various treatment options that are available.
  • Dynacirc Side Effects
    Common Dynacirc side effects may include nausea, dizziness, and fatigue. This page from the eMedTV Web site also lists rare but possible side effects of the drug, as well as potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Dynacirc Uses
    Dynacirc is primarily used for controlling high blood pressure in adults. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains how the prescription medicine works to lower blood pressure and discusses possible off-label Dynacirc uses.
  • Dynacirc Warnings and Precautions
    Dynacirc may cause low blood pressure in some people. This eMedTV Web page explains what other side effects or complications may occur with the use of Dynacirc. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug are also included.
  • Effects of Furosemide
    Furosemide is a medication shown to significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. This eMedTV page explores other beneficial effects of furosemide and explains how the drug works specifically for high blood pressure and water retention.
  • Eprosartan
    Eprosartan is a prescription drug approved to lower blood pressure. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look this medication, with details on how it works, potential side effects, tips for when and how to take it, and general precautions.
  • Eprosartan Dosage
    The usual eprosartan dosage is typically between 400 mg and 800 mg total each day. This eMedTV article covers general dosing guidelines for this blood pressure medication and highlights some important tips for when and how to take this drug.
  • Eprosartan Drug Information
    Eprosartan is a medicine prescribed to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV page offers more information on eprosartan, explaining the drug's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and what to discuss with your doctor before beginning treatment.
  • Essential Hypertension Risks
    You can control some essential hypertension risks, such as being inactive and consuming too much salt. This eMedTV article discusses these and other risks associated with high blood pressure -- in particular, those that affect African Americans.
  • Fosinopril Sodium-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV article explores the blood pressure medication fosinopril sodium-hydrochlorothiazide. It looks at side effects, dosing, and active ingredients. Also included is a link to more detailed information.
  • Fosinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV article talks about fosinopril-hydrochlorothiazide, a drug that is prescribed to lower high blood pressure in adults. This page also describes potential side effects of this drug, as well as general dosing guidelines.
  • Fosinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide Dosing
    This eMedTV segment explains that the recommended starting dose of fosinopril-hydrochlorothiazide varies between 10 mg/12.5 mg and 20 mg/12.5 mg once a day. This article also covers general guidelines for fosinopril-hydrochlorothiazide dosing.
  • Fosinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide Uses
    As this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, fosinopril-hydrochlorothiazide uses include lowering high blood pressure in adults. This article explores how the medication works to relax the blood vessels and reduce blood volume.
  • Frusemide
    Furosemide is a prescription medicine approved to control high blood pressure and treat fluid retention. This eMedTV page explains how furosemide works and lists potential side effects of the drug. Frusemide is a common misspelling of furosemide.
  • Furosemid
    If you have high blood pressure or fluid retention, your doctor may prescribe the diuretic furosemide. This eMedTV segment explains how furosemide works and describes the effects of the medicine. Furosemid is a common misspelling of furosemide.
  • Furosemide
    Furosemide is a prescription drug licensed to treat fluid retention and control high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at how furosemide works, potential side effects, and information on when and how to take the drug.
  • Furosemide (Lasix) Information
    Doctors often prescribe the diuretic furosemide for the treatment of high blood pressure or fluid retention. This eMedTV page offers more furosemide (Lasix) information, including details on how the drug works and important warnings and precautions.
  • Furosemide 20 mg Tablets
    Many people being treated for water retention start with furosemide 20 mg tablets (one tablet daily). As this eMedTV page explains, some people may need up to 600 mg daily. This article also offers dosing guidelines for treating high blood pressure.
  • Furosemide 40 mg Tablets
    Most people with high blood pressure start with furosemide 40 mg tablets (one tablet, twice daily). This eMedTV page also offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of water retention and lists some of the possible side effects seen with furosemide.
  • Furosemide 80 mg Tablets
    There are three strengths available for furosemide: 80 mg tablets are the highest available strength. This eMedTV Web page lists other strengths of this drug and offers dosing guidelines for treating high blood pressure and water retention.
  • Furosemide Alternatives
    If you do not respond well to furosemide, many other medications are available to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource provides a list of common alternatives to furosemide, including other types of diuretics and other drug classes.
  • Furosemide and Breastfeeding
    Studies on furosemide and breastfeeding show that the medication passes through breast milk. As this eMedTV Web page explains, however, there have been no reports of problems in breastfeeding women using this drug or their babies.
  • Furosemide and Pregnancy
    Taking furosemide during pregnancy may cause problems for the unborn child. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this important topic and describes the problems that occurred when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Furosemide Blood Pressure Medicine
    Furosemide, a blood pressure medicine, can also be used to treat fluid retention. This article found on the eMedTV Web site offers information on how furosemide works, describes the specific effects of this diuretic, and links to more information.
  • Furosemide Dangers
    If you have kidney disease, furosemide may cause the condition to become worse. This page from the eMedTV library explores other potential dangers of furosemide and offers important information on who should avoid this particular diuretic medication.
  • Furosemide Dosing
    The recommended starting furosemide dosage for treating high blood pressure is 40 mg twice daily. This eMedTV Web site also contains dosing suggestions for the treatment of water retention and discusses furosemide use in children.
  • Furosemide Drug Information
    Furosemide is a prescription medicine licensed to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention. This eMedTV Web page contains more furosemide drug information, including how it works, important warnings and precautions, and links to more information.
  • Furosemide Oral
    Furosemide is a diuretic often prescribed to treat high blood pressure or water retention. This eMedTV page offers suggestions on when and how to take furosemide oral tablets and explains how this medication works for hypertension and fluid retention.
  • Furosemide Overdose
    An overdose of furosemide may lead to dehydration, low blood pressure, or low electrolytes. This eMedTV resource lists other signs and symptoms when too much furosemide is taken and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Furosemide Pills
    Furosemide is a prescription diuretic medicine used for treating high blood pressure and fluid retention. This eMedTV article briefly explains when and how to take furosemide pills and provides general warnings and precautions for this drug.
  • Furosemide Problems
    Furosemide may cause side effects such as fever, headache, or vision changes. This segment from the eMedTV archives provides list of other reported problems with furosemide and offers information on who should not use this medication.
  • Furosemide Risks
    Furosemide has been reported to worsen gout and certain other medical conditions. This page on the eMedTV site covers other possible furosemide risks, explains who should not use this drug, and lists some of the commonly reported side effects.
  • Furosemide Side Affects
    Some of the common furosemide side effects can include fever, headaches, and vision changes. This eMedTV page lists several other possible side effects. Furosemide side affects is a common misspelling and variation of side effects of furosemide.
  • Furosemide Strengths
    Furosemide is a prescription medicine used for treating high blood pressure and water retention. This eMedTV segment lists the various available forms and strengths of furosemide, explains how it works, and links to in-depth information.
  • Furosemide Tablets
    Furosemide is a prescription drug used for treating high blood pressure and fluid retention. This eMedTV article offers information on when and how to take furosemide tablets, explains how this drug works, and includes a link to more information.
  • Furosimide
    Furosemide is a diuretic often prescribed to treat fluid retention or high blood pressure. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works for these conditions and lists some of its possible side effects. Furosimide is a common misspelling of furosemide.
  • Furosomide
    Furosemide is a prescription drug licensed to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource discusses these furosemide uses in more detail and explains how the drug works. Furosomide is a common misspelling of furosemide.
  • Generic Aceon
    As this eMedTV article explains, Aceon is now available in generic form. This resource talks about the different strengths available for the generic versions and lists the companies who manufacture them.
  • Generic Benazepril
    This page on the eMedTV Web site offers a general overview of generic benazepril, which is sold under the name Benazepril HCL tablets. This page lists several companies that manufacture the drug, as well as a few of its available strengths.
  • Generic Benazepril-Amlodipine
    This eMedTV article offers an overview of generic benazepril-amlodipine. As this page explains, the generic medicine has been given an "AB" rating by the FDA (meaning that it should be equivalent to brand-name Lotrel).
  • Generic Benazepril-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV page explains that generic benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide is currently available under the name Benazepril Hydrochloride and Hydrochlorothiazide tablets. This page also lists some of the companies that make the drug.
  • Generic Calan SR
    Generic Calan SR is available in three strengths and is made by several manufacturers. This portion of the eMedTV library also explains how the FDA has determined that generic Calan SR is as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Cardene SR
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, Cardene SR is not yet available as a generic. This article takes a look at why there is currently no generic version available and compares nicardipine to generic Cardene SR.
  • Generic Cardizem LA
    As this eMedTV article explains, Cardizem LA is now available in generic form. This resource further discusses the availability of generic Cardizem LA and briefly explains the difference between Cardizem LA and other diltiazem products.
  • Generic Catapres-TTS
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Catapres-TTS (clonidine) is currently available in generic form. This article takes an in-depth look at the generic versions of this drug, including who makes them and what strengths they come in.
  • Generic Demadex
    Generic Demadex is available in a variety of strengths, including 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, and 100 mg. This eMedTV resource explains that generic Demadex is available in tablet form or as an injection, and lists some of the makers of the medication.
  • Generic Diuril
    Diuril is currently only available in generic form. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, generic Diuril (known as chlorothiazide) comes in 250 mg and 500 mg tablets; an injectable version is also available.
  • Generic Dynacirc
    Brand-name Dynacirc is no longer being made, but generic Dynacirc products are available. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists the strengths available for generic Dynacirc and explains which drug companies manufacture the products.
  • Generic HCTZ
    Generic HCTZ, which is sold in tablet or capsule form, comes in a variety of strengths. As this eMedTV segment explains, generic HCTZ is manufactured by a number of drug companies and is available as 15 mg capsules, 25 mg tablets, and 50 mg tablets.
  • Generic InnoPran XL
    There are currently no generic InnoPran XL (propranolol XL) products available for sale. As this eMedTV page explains, the earliest date that a generic form of InnoPran XL may become available is December 2022, when the patent for the drug expires.
  • Generic Isoptin SR
    This eMedTV Web page explains the various strengths of generic Isoptin SR that are currently available. This article also explains how the FDA has determined that generic Isoptin SR is equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Kerlone
    Kerlone (betaxolol) is currently available in both brand-name and generic form. This part of the eMedTV library lists the various strengths available for generic Kerlone and explains whether these generic products are as good as brand-name Kerlone.
  • Generic Lisinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide
    As explained on this eMedTV Web page, there is a generic lisinopril-hydrochlorothiazide medicine available called Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide tablets. It comes in three strengths and is produced by several companies.
  • Generic Midamor
    Generic Midamor is currently available in one strength -- Amiloride 5 mg tablets. This portion of the eMedTV Web site discusses generic Midamor, including information on why the brand-name version is no longer being manufactured.
  • Generic Moduretic
    Moduretic is currently available in generic form only. As this eMedTV segment explains, three companies currently manufacture it. This article also explains why the original manufacturer of brand-name Moduretic no longer makes the drug.
  • Generic Olmesartan
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains why there is currently no generic olmesartan available. This page also explains when the generic form may become available and warns against buying any drug that claims to be a generic version.
  • Generic Olmesartan Medoxomil-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV article explains why there is currently no generic olmesartan medoxomil-hydrochlorothiazide for sale on the market. This article also explains why the earliest date a generic version of the drug could become available is in 2016.
  • Generic Plendil
    There is a generic version of Plendil available on the market under the name Felodipine tablets. This eMedTV Web page lists the available strengths and explains how the FDA has determined that generic Plendil is as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Procardia XL
    Generic Procardia XL is sold under the names Nifedipine extended-release tablets and Nifedical XL tablets. This eMedTV Web page outlines the various strengths available and discusses how generic Procardia XL is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Sectral
    Sectral (acebutolol) is currently available in both brand-name and generic form. This eMedTV segment lists the various strengths available for generic Sectral capsules and explains whether these products are equivalent to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Tekturna HCT
    This eMedTV page explains that there is no generic Tekturna HCT (aliskiren-HCTZ) product available at this time. This page explains when a generic version of the drug might become available and covers why aliskiren-HCTZ is not a generic Tekturna HCT.
  • Generic Telmisartan
    Looking for information on generic telmisartan? As this eMedTV article explains, you can now buy generic versions of this medication in three different strengths. This page offers more details on generic telmisartan.
  • Generic Telmisartan/Hydrochlorothiazide
    How does generic telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide compare to brand-name Micardis HCT? This eMedTV article has the answer. In this selection, we take an in-depth look at the generic version, with details on available strengths, manufacturer info, and more.
  • Generic Teveten HCT
    This eMedTV page explains why there are no generic Teveten HCT (eprosartan/HCTZ) products and discusses when a generic might become available. This article also discusses whether it is cheaper to take the medications in Teveten HCT as two separate pills.
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